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This Day in FAA History: May 26th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19610526: FAA Administrator Halaby disclosed his intention to decentralize the agency’s operational responsibilities and broaden the authority of regional executives. He selected FAA’s Region One, with Headquarters in New York, for the pilot program, and chose Oscar Bakke, head of the Bureau of Flight Standards, to develop the program and to submit a transition plan which would be used as a model for reorganization of the other regions. Bakke assumed the title of Assistant Administrator for the Eastern Region, effective July 1 (see that date).
19650526: In the U.S. Army’s closely contested light observation helicopter competition, the Hughes Model 369 (YOH-6A) was announced the winner over two other entries, the Bell 206 (OH-4A) and the Fairchild-Hiller 1100 (OH-5A1).

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This Day in FAA History: May 25th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19610525: A Special Civil Air Regulation effective this date banned the use of portable FM radios on U.S. civil aircraft. Radios having oscillators operating within or very near the Very High Frequency (VHF) band affected the VHF radio navigation system of the aircraft.
19700525: FAA issued the first supplemental type certificate for installation and operation of area navigation equipment in general aviation aircraft to the Butler National Corporation for use of the Butler Vector Analog Computer. The certificate permitted the use of this equipment during the en route, terminal, and approach phases of operation. (See October 1, 1969.)
19780525: PATCO began intermittent slowdowns to protest the refusal of some U.S. flag carriers to provide controllers with overseas familiarization flights.

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This Day in FAA History: May 24th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19460524: The Civil Aeronautics Administration gave an initial demonstration of the first radar-equipped control tower for civilian flying atop the agency’s Experimental Station at Indianapolis Municipal Airport. Raytheon had built the basic radar equipment for the Navy, and the company’s engineers directed modifications at Indianapolis that included improvements lately developed for that service. Among these were an improved search antenna and a feature that eliminated ground clutter by permitting only moving targets to appear on the screen. (See June 30, 1945.)
19500524: Reorganization Plan No. 5 became effective. The plan, one of a number put into effect under the Reorganization Act of 1949, stemmed in part from recommendations of the Hoover Commission (see March 1, 1949).

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This Day in FAA History: May 23rd

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19260523: Western Air Express (WAE) became one of the first U.S. airlines to offer regular passenger service, flying from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City via Las Vegas. WAE had begun flying on April 17 as the fourth carrier to begin operations under a new air mail contract system that became the major source of income for the era’s small but growing airline industry (see June 3, 1926).
Over twelve years earlier, the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line had offered the world’s first regularly scheduled airline service using heavier-than-air craft. This enterprise lasted for only the first three months of 1914. On March 1, 1925, T. Claude Ryan’s Los Angeles-San Diego Air Line had begun the first scheduled passenger service operated wholly over the U.S. mainland and throughout the year.
19330523: Clarence M. Young resigned as Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics, effective June 15. (See June 10, 1933.)
19480523: The Secretaries of Defense and Commerce announced preliminary agreement to set up an Air Navigation Development Board (ANDB).

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This Day in FAA History: May 22nd

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19320522: Amelia Earhart became the first woman to make a solo crossing of the Atlantic by airplane, flying from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in a Lockheed Vega.
19620522: An explosion blew the tail off a Continental Air Lines 707 flying over southern Iowa, killing all 45 persons aboard. Officials later cited the probable cause as a dynamite detonation in a rear lavatory. On June 5, a government/industry steering committee headed by FAA Administrator Halaby convened to review efforts to combat the aircraft bombing hazard.
19690522: Administrator Shaffer requested plans for consolidating regional and area offices located in the same city within the contiguous United States.

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This Day in FAA History: May 21st

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19270521: Charles A. Lindbergh, a former air mail pilot, made the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic in an airplane, a Ryan monoplane dubbed the Spirit of St. Louis. He flew the 3,610 miles from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, N.Y., to Le Bourget Field, Paris, France, in 33 hours 29 minutes.
Lindbergh’s feat provided a strong stimulus to U.S. aviation, and made him a world hero whose fame overshadowed earlier Atlantic crossings by air.

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This Day in FAA History: May 20th

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This Day in FAA History: May 19th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19300519: Postmaster General Walter Folger Brown held the first of a series of meetings with representatives of the large commercial airlines to discuss air mail routes to be awarded under the Watres Act (see April 29, 1930). All but two of the twenty-two air mail contracts awarded under the act went to airlines in attendance at the meetings, which were subsequently attacked as “spoils conferences.” (See February 9, 1934.)
19390519: The Civil Aeronautics Authority announced issuance of a certificate of public convenience and necessity to Pan American Airways authorizing transatlantic air transport service of two round trips per week. Before any passengers were to be carried, Pan American was required to complete a minimum of five trips as proving flights (see June 28, 1939); however, Pan American began the first regular transatlantic airplane mail service on May 20.
19660519: According to a Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences staff report entitled, “Policy Planning for Aeronautical Research and Development,” civil aeronautics was served by technology in a haphazard manner.

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This Day in FAA History: May 18th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19490518: New York’s first helicopter station began operating at pier 41 on the East River.
19510518: Charles F. Horne became Administrator of Civil Aeronautics. He succeeded Donald W. Nyrop (see October 4, 1950), who became Chairman of the Civil Aeronautics Board on this same day. (Nyrop had submitted his resignation from the CAA post on March 18.) Horne, a regular Navy officer, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1926 and received an M.S. degree in communications and electronics from Harvard in 1935. On loan from the Navy, he became Acting Director of CAA’s Airways Division in 1949.

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This Day in FAA History: May 17th

Full FAA Chronology at this link.
19280517: Another amendment to the Air Mail Act of 1925 (see June 3, 1926) provided that air carriers that had operated satisfactorily on mail routes for two years could exchange their contracts for “air mail route certificates” for a period not to exceed 10 years. The amendment protected the investment of the airlines in the equipment necessary for carrying out their original contracts since the life of that equipment was considerably longer than the life of those contracts. At this time, mail contracts provided virtually the only profitable form of airline operation. (See April 29, 1930.)
19850517: United Airlines pilots went on strike over the company’s plan for a two-tiered pay structure with lower pay for new pilots. The union and management soon reached an economic agreement that permitted such a two-tier system, but back-to-work issues delayed settlement until June 14.